Moyamoya disease Treatment in Hyderabad

overview

Moyamoya disease
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Moyamoya disease is a rare blood vessel disease in which the carotid artery in the skull becomes blocked or narrowed, which reduces blood flow to your brain. Tiny blood vessels then open at the base of the brain to supply blood to the brain.

The condition can cause a mini-stroke (temporary ischemic attack), stroke, or bleeding in the brain. It can also affect the way your brain works, causing cognitive and developmental delays or disabilities.

Moyamoya disease most commonly affects children, but adults can get it. Moyamoya disease is common around the world, but is more common in East Asian countries, particularly Korea, Japan, and China. This can be due to certain genetic factors in these populations. Moyamoya disease Treatment in Hyderabad

symptoms

Moyamoya disease can appear at any age, although symptoms most commonly appear between the ages of 5 and 10 years in children and between 30 and 50 years in adults.

The first symptom of Moyamoya disease is usually a stroke or a recurrent transient ischemic attack (TIA), especially in children. Adults can experience these symptoms as well, as well as bleeding in the brain (hemorrhagic stroke) due to abnormal blood vessels in the brain. Moyamoya disease Treatment in Hyderabad

The accompanying signs and symptoms of Moyamoya disease related to decreased blood flow to the brain include:

The reasons

The exact cause of Moyamoya disease is unknown. Moyamoya disease is most common in Japan, Korea, and China, but is also found in other parts of the world. Researchers believe the higher prevalence in these Asian countries strongly suggests a genetic factor in some populations.

Moyamoya is also linked to certain medical conditions, such as Down syndrome, sickle cell anemia, type 1 neurofibromatosis, and hyperthyroidism. Moyamoya disease Treatment in Hyderabad

Risk factors

Although the cause of Moyamoya disease is unknown, certain factors can increase your risk of developing the disease, including:

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